Organisation

SAFe: What’s a Release Train Engineer?

SAFe introduces a new role in the industry: the release train engineer (RTE). A RTE is, according to the framework:

The Release Train Engineer (RTE) is a servant leader and coach for the Agile Release Train (ART). The RTE’s major responsibilities are to facilitate the ART events and processes and assist the teams in delivering value. RTEs communicate with stakeholders, escalate impediments, help manage risk, and drive relentless improvement.

The role is designed like a scrum master at the ART level. At a minimum, a RTE ensures that the process is followed. But a good RTE helps teams improve their performance – that’s the essence of the job. A RTE doesn’t have any authority over the content in the backlog. The focus on only on improvement at the organisational level. As such, the wording “assist the teams in delivering value” leaves quite some lattitude in how impactful an RTE can be.

What do you expect from a RTE? I am wondering how this role will establish itself in the industry. Here are my personal expectations.

Level I – The Organizer. The RTE ensures that the process is followed. He/She ensures that information flows between the teams using the elements of the framework. The RTE helps resolve problems related to the work environement as they appear. Example of such problem could be: tools to communicate, organisation of the program backlog, running the ART events. He/She makes sure people can work.

Level II – The Moderator. The RTE is able to create plattforms or use existing plattforms to encourge discussions in the ART / Solution. With some moderation talent, he/she can help instill change, support improvements, or create alignment. The RTE helps resolve problems about team performance as they appear. Example of such problem could be: interpersonal issues, improving the collaboration with a specific provider, managing morale in challenging time, ensuring transparency, suggesting a feature stop to address the existing bugs first.

Level III – The Influencer. The RTE identifies systemic performance issues in the organisation and work towards resolving them by instilling change at the organisation, technical, or product management levels. Example of such issues could be: addressing systemic quality issues due to the work culture, working with the system architects/teams/system team to make the continous delivery pipeline faster, encouraging decentral decision-making (while managing risks), improving feedback loops.

The higher the level, the more interdisciplinary the RTE will have to work. While little knowledge of product management or architecture is needed to be proficient at level I, problems at level II and III will require a good understanding of how engineering works and how product management, technology and processes influence each others. On the technology front, the RTE is also a key stakeholder to support mindset like DevOps, which means he must also have some good understanding of how technology supports delivery and operations.

The RTE role ressembles that of the more established delivery manager. Both focus on similar sets of issues.

The big difference between both roles lies I think in the mindset. A RTE is a coach and as such has little formal authority in itself. He leads by helping other take the right call. A delivery manager will typically have more formal authority. For instance, a RTE has no authority over the priorisation of backlog in itself. The PM and PO have formally this responsability. The RTE coaches the PM/PO in priorizing work.

The higher the level, the more the RTE works at the level of the engineering culture. It’s easy to define values and visions that nobody follows. Culture is defined by how people effectively behaves. It’s hard to be a good RTE. Just like it’s hard to be a good scrum master. Changing how people work isn’t easy.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s