Thinking

SAFe: Systems Thinking

I was pleasently surprised to see Systems Thinking as principle #2 in SAFe. I recently came in contact with systems thinking when reading Limits to Growth, which explores the feedack loops in the global economy. Donella Meadows is also the author of Thinking in Systems, which addresses more generally how to understand complex systems dynamics with such feedback loops (the book is in my list of to-read).

This is the definiton of systems thinking according to SAFe:

Systems thinking takes a holistic approach to solution development, incorporating all aspects of a system and its environment into the design, development, deployment, and maintenance of the system itself.

It’s quite general. But arguably, there isn’t one definiton of systems thinking. If you read Tools for Systems Thinker, the study of feedback loops is only one aspect of systems thinking. The more general theme is to understand the “interconntedness” of the elements in the system.

A system is a set of releated components that work together in a particular environment to perform watherver funtions are required to achieve the system’s objective. – Donella Meadows

Principle #2 in SAFe is about realizing that the solution, but also the organisation, are complex systems that benefit from systems thinking.

Interestingly, Large Scale Scrum (LeSS) also has systems thinking as principle. It’s more concrete than the equivalent principle in SAFe. The emphasis is on seeing system dynamics, espectially with causal loop diagrams. The article is a very good introduction to such diagram. Here’s an exmaple of a very simple causal loop diagram:

systems thinking-7.png

I like the emphasis on actively visualizing system dynamic:

The practical aspect of this tip (NB: visualizing) is more important than may first be appreciated. It is vague and low-impact to suggest “be a systems thinker.” But if you and four colleagues get into the habit of standing together at a large whiteboard, sketching causal loop diagrams together, then there is a concrete and potentially high-impact practice that connects “be a systems thinker” with “do systems thinking.”

The idea is that it’s only when you start visualizing the systems dynamics that you also start understanding the mental models that people have, and only then can you start discussing about improvements.

I like the more concrete way to address system thinking in LeSS as in SAFe. Recently, I discussed with our RTE about some cultural issue related to knowhow sharing. Using a causal loop diagram would have been a very good vehicule to brainstom about the problem. I think I will borrow the tip from LeSS and start sketching such diagrams during conversations.

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